Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
General Beekeeping / Re: One queenless one with laying workers....
« Last post by Bakersdozen on Today at 07:40:52 PM »
I had that same problem just yesterday and this is what I did with a laying worker colony.  I did a shake out.  I separated the brood boxes and took them about 30 ft away from the location.  I proceeded to shake and brush every frame and walk them back to the original site, beeless.  I reassembled the hive one beeless frame at a time.  A few hours later I introduced a new queen.  They all ran over to greet her.  The laying worker had been there for some time.  I found lots and lots of drone brood on 6 or so frames. 
2
General Beekeeping / Re: One queenless one with laying workers....
« Last post by Perry on Today at 07:37:03 PM »
I'm a softie, what can I say. I always like to give everything a chance. :-[
3
Real close to what the queen seller said Perry except he said to just dump them and start over. Thanks....
4
General Beekeeping / Re: Combining Hives
« Last post by Perry on Today at 07:00:39 PM »
Equalizing can be relatively simple to do. If there isn't too large a discrepancy in the hives, simply switching their positions at the height of the day can accomplish much.
5
General Beekeeping / Re: One queenless one with laying workers....
« Last post by Perry on Today at 06:58:48 PM »
Laying workers rarely accept a new queen! What can be done with a laying worker hive is to install a frame of open brood once a week for a couple of weeks, and then add a new queen (unless they are trying to raise one of their own). The pheromone coming off the open brood begins to inhibit the laying workers making the hive more receptive to a new queen.
Buy one queen for now.
6
General Beekeeping / One queenless one with laying workers....
« Last post by Nugget Shooter on Today at 06:26:22 PM »
OK Here is my question, I am going to pick up a new queen for one of my recent cutouts, lots of bees, no eggs nor are they making queen cups. Hopefully they accept her.

Other queenless cutout has laying workers.... 4 or 5 eggs to a cell, no larva, no brood. Is it worth trying to add a queen?

Going into Honey Hive Farms in Phoenix tomorrow and just not sure how many queens to get so looking for advise here....
7
General Beekeeping / Re: Combining Hives
« Last post by Lburou on Today at 05:53:14 PM »
The bees will take care of the paper, if that is what you decide to do.   My first thought reading your OP was as Perry suggested.  Then I remembered one of the most accomplished beekeepers on this site, Tec, showed me a two hives at the Texas A&M Bee Lab he was equalizing exactly as you described.  I'm most comfortable equalizing as Perry  suggested, but the other  approach will work as well.  :)
8
Pests and Diseases / Re: Mite on queen
« Last post by joeybrowne on Today at 04:45:56 PM »
Checked the queen and the mite was gone.   On a side note,  when working with your bees don't set your cell on vibrate and place in your front pant  pockets. .... the scare i got when i felt it vibrate and thought it was a bee about to sting me 'you know where"....
9
General Beekeeping / Re: Combining Hives
« Last post by Perry on Today at 04:14:48 PM »
Hey Tommy. How weak is the weak hive? If the weaker one is just that, why not equalize the two instead of combining, or were you thinking of trying to run a 2 queen hive?
10
General Beekeeping / Combining Hives
« Last post by Tommy on Today at 03:57:13 PM »
Hey all. I have a weak hive and a strong hive.  As per some Provincial literature I've read, I decided to stack the weak hive over the strong hive. A queen excluder with a sheet of news paper (with several slits) is placed on top between the boxes. I believe there is a queen in each box. The slits in the paper where to provide an opportunity to adjust to each other.  Can I remove the paper or should I let the bees take care of it?

Thanks!
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10